Apple remains the most powerful brand in the world ahead of Google, Amazon and Microsoft

Apple remains by far the most powerful brand in the world in Interbrand's annual brand ranking. The apple brand remains at the top of this ranking for 7 consecutive years. This year, it is close in the right order by Google, Amazon and Microsoft.


Unsurprisingly, once again this year, Apple has been named the most powerful brand in the world by Interbrand - whose ranking is to put a financial value behind brand names. This value represents "the impact that a strong brand can have on key groups that influence the growth of a company, including current and future consumers, employees and investors," says Interbrand, adding that "strong brands influence consumer choices and create loyalty, attract retain, motivate talent, and lower the cost of financing. "

Apple, Google, Amazon and Microsoft, the most powerful brands in the world

According to this definition, the Apple brand saw its value rise by 9% to $ 234.241 billion. The firm is followed by Google which rose 8% to $ 167.713 billion, Amazon (+ 24% to $ 125.263 billion) and Microsoft (+ 17% to $ 108.847 billion). These last two companies represent the strongest progression of the top 10 of which here is the list:


  1. Apple
  2. Google
  3. Amazon
  4. Microsoft
  5. Coca Cola
  6. Samsung
  7. Toyota
  8. Mercedes
  9. McDonalds
  10. Disney

Of course you should not take the amounts for cash. It is more of a calculation sum that aggregates precise assessments on 10 criteria: integrity, governance, responsiveness, relevance, commitment (deep understanding, active participation and strong brand-to-consumer identification), differentiation, consistency , authenticity and presence.

9to5Mac reports that this year as in 2018, Apple has been particularly distinguished by Interbrand in the categories "differentiation" (which makes it possible to identify the brand in relation to the competition) and "governance" (the management of the company and its internal management).

Source : 9to5Mac